A Committed Leader

A Committed Leader

Readings, Nehemiah: (1: 4-23)

By: Pastor Stanley Mutiza (The Well of Life Ministries in Bethal)

Nehemiah had faith, though he had never been to Jerusalem, but he heard from his elders as to how the city of God looks.

He also heard what God had done for his people, Israelites. When he had that the wall of Jerusalem lied in ruin and that the gates had been burned he was deeply depressed. Before taking any action he prayed and fasted (Neh. 1:4).

Why did he pray?

Prayer internalises the burden. Prayer insists that we quiet our hearts and wait, slowing us down to receive from God. Prayer infuses the vision, enabling us to see what God wants to do. Prayer initiates the vision’s fulfilment, acting as a catalyst for us to act.

Nehemiah then went to speak to King Artaxexes because he prayed and God had softened the king’s heart, so Nehemiah was sent to Judah. Nehemiah could tell the king his exact plan of action. 52 days to rebuild the walls.

Nehemiah’s commitment

Nehemiah spent time in prayer he knew what need to be done (letters to governors, timber from Asphat). He had an exact time frame. He knew the key influences to approach, such as the Persian King Artexexes.

He assessed the situation and said first-hand the challenges facing him. He met with some people to get a buy in from them (priests, nobles, Jews, officials and people who did the work. He described his vision for rebuilding the wall and the spiritual ramification of the project (Neh 2, 16-17).

He organised the people and get them working. He never lost focus of the work at hand.

What was Nehemiah secret for success?

Nehemiah relied on God. He respected the opposite. He reinforced his weak point. He re-assured the people. He refused to quit. He renewed the people’s strength continually (Nehemiah 4, 4-23).

What can we learn from Nehemiah?

The power of compelling purpose.  The power of prayer.  The power of persistence. The power of commitment. The power of faith in people you are with.

Sales Representatives Wanted

Sales Representatives Wanted

We are deeply concerned about the increasing Jobless rate in South Africa. Research conducted confirmed that South Africa has more than 25% of unemployed people. Thus as a developing company, we feel the need to help and contribute in the job creation process This year alone, the company is committed to contract with 100 people who will serve as Sales Representatives of the company.

It’s simple, all what is needed to become Xpres sales representative is :-

  • To be 18 years or older
  • Have a valid ID or passport
  • Have a bank account in South Africa
  • Reside in Mpumalanga

If you are a non-South African living in South Africa (Mpumalanga), and want to earn an income from Xpres, you also need:

  • A valid work permit
  • To be registered as a South African tax payer

Business Development Sales Representative (BDSR)

The Business Development Sales Representative (BDSR) is expected to sell the company’s services to small, medium and large sized prospects. The BDSR may have a secondary focus on putting together strategies to grow and develop the company’s customer base, as assigned by management. Reporting to the Marketing Director, the BDSR closes and implements growth opportunities of moderate complexity within an assigned jurisdiction/area. The BDSR’s most important means of interacting with customers and prospects is through face-to-face meetings. The BDSR is responsible for achieving an assigned sales and profit goal. Each BDSR starters can earn up to R10 000 Per month, working from home!

Are you 1 of the 100? Evaluate yourself using the criteria below

  • I am energetic
  • I am an excellent interpersonal Team Player
  • I am Motivated and goal driven
  • I am enthusiastic
  • I am Target orientated
  • I am a Keen Negotiator
  • I am a Good Communicator
  • I am well presented
  • I am staying in Mpumalanga Province

If this is you, we invite you to become 1 of our 100 Sales Representatives. By working hard, you will have the opportunity to earn a monthly income of up to R 10 000 per month!

All interested and suitably qualified applicants should submit a written application and detailed CV via e-mail: info@xpresholdings.co.za  or fax to 086 655 3554.

For more information call Xpres’ Call- Centre 086 1197 737

I Am A Woman – Mashudu Malaudzi

I Am A Woman – Mashudu Malaudzi

Event Name: I AM A WOMAN, I HAVE A PURPOSE

Date: 02 September 2017

Place: Umuzi Lodge (Secunda)

Time: 11:00

Entrance Fee: R200

Guest Speakers: Ps Nthabiseng Magongo (Chairwoman – Reaching the Nations); Apostle Khuls Mtseftwa (CEO – Swatek Electrical); Ps Nthabeleng Mogale ( Founder – BBM)

Host: Mashudu Constance Malaudzi

I Have A Purpose, I Am A Woman

I Have A Purpose, I Am A Woman

Event Name: I AM A WOMAN, I HAVE A PURPOSE

Date: 02 September 2017

Place: Umuzi Lodge (Secunda)

Time: 11:00

Entrance Fee: R200

Guest Speakers: Ps Nthabiseng Magongo (Chairwoman – Reaching the Nations); Apostle Khuls Mtseftwa (CEO – Swatek Electrical); Ps Nthabeleng Mogale ( Founder – BBM)

Host: Mashudu Constance Malaudzi

I Am A Woman, I Have A Purpose

I Am A Woman, I Have A Purpose

Event Name: I AM A WOMAN, I HAVE A PURPOSE

Date: 02 September 2017

Place: Umuzi Lodge (Secunda)

Time: 11:00

Entrance Fee: R200

Guest Speakers: Ps Nthabiseng Magongo (Chairwoman – Reaching the Nations); Apostle Khuls Mtseftwa (CEO – Swatek Electrical); Ps Nthabeleng Mogale ( Founder – BBM)

Host: Mashudu Constance Malaudzi

Queue Management and Managing Expectations

Queue Management and Managing Expectations

By Leeash Rooifontein

Service is not consumed, it is experienced. Service means a lot in all business and how we offer it makes the ultimate differentiator and I’ve experienced this first hand during the course of my career.

The one problem I often wondered about the most is why some people where so apprehensive with the prospect of standing in a queue, which in my opinion accounts for at least one third of the service experience in any business.

Especially in the context of South Africa, were we not the ones that showed the world how patient we were in 1994 during election time? And yet clients, at least in my experience, sometimes snapped or argued or felt offended to stand in the line at the end of the month, let alone just turning away from a queue. I’ve always found myself compelled to do something about it.

I found an article written by Alex Stone in opinion column in the New York Times in which he explains events that took place in an airport in Houston. The clients had been complaining about waiting at the baggage claim, although most if not all the clients waited within the appropriate time frames.

The executives in response increased the amount of baggage handlers which decreased the amount of time in waiting to well below industry averages, however complaints persisted. Upon further careful inspection the executives found that up to 88 % of the client’s time, even with improvements, was spent waiting and standing around doing nothing in anticipation for their baggage.

The airport decided on a new approach. They moved the baggage terminal to the other side of the airport which took the passengers longer on average to get to the baggage counter while the clients themselves perceived themselves to be busy and it gave more time for the baggage handlers. The strategy was a success, the complaints dropped almost down to zero.

The conclusion I immediately took from the story is that is not the actually time that the client spends in the queue, but the perception of how long or even the quality of the experience the client waits in the queue. I saw that is almost useless to count the physical minutes any client waits but to consider how the client feels while waiting and that feeling is almost always objective.

I decided to do research on how people, particularly in South Africa, feel and perceive being in a queue. I quickly realised that this is aspect of our lives that most companies neglected and most people shrugged away.

I soon found that queuing and psychology behind queuing was an aspect that affected our everyday lives in more ways that most can imagine. Think about it? We experience them in supermarkets, in banks, at the hospitals and pharmacies, in all government institutions, at traffic intersections, on the phone with call centres and on the internet.

Not to mention all the other abstract ways we can’t even being to possibly comprehend, like waiting to meet the love of your life.

This thinking and the abovementioned article led me to Dr David Maister and an article, psychology of waiting lines, in which he explains the pillar or what today has commonly known as the tenets of queuing. These tenets are as follows

  • Unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time.
  • A pre-process wait feels longer than an in-process wait.
  • Anxiety makes a wait seem longer.
  • An uncertain wait feels longer than a known finite wait.
  • An unexplained wait feels longer than an explained wait.
  • An unfair wait feels longer than a fair wait.

Perception, managing expectations and how the customer does feel while or before being serviced matters. According to David Maister, customers over exaggerate by at least three times every minute spent while waiting if unattended or not knowing when they will be assisted.

It is important to close the gap between when the client walks through your door (service inception) and actual interaction with the customer representative (service closure). It is important that we decide to change our mind-set when it comes to matter like queuing. Queue management is simply the art of managing expectations and managing expectation is the art of managing promises

Sasol Hosts Technical Teachers Conference

Sasol Hosts Technical Teachers Conference

The Deputy Minister of the Department of Basic Education Hon. Enver Surty, speaking at the opening of the Sasol Technical Teachers Conference, held in Secunda (Mpumalanga)

 

Sasol hosts Technical Teachers conference for the first time in Mpumalanga

Secunda, Mpumalanga – The Sasol Technical Teachers conference was held at the Sasol Secunda Recreation Club. The conference ran from Thursday, 29 June to Saturday, 01 July 2017.

Hosted by Sasol Inzalo Foundation, the foundation focuses on boosting vocational skills pool for the country to meet the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030 target of 30 000 artisans through its Technical Schools of Excellence Network (TechSENet) programme.

According  Mr Alex Anderson, Sasol Group’s Head of Media Relations,  since 2015, the foundation has invested in 5 500 learners and their teachers from 5 technical schools in Free State, Gauteng and Mpumalanga, with an aim to develop schools to technical excellence and build a pipeline for artisans, STEM technicians and technologists.

“This will be realised by increasing the numbers and calibre of learners doing technical subjects and upgrading the equipment status in the technical workshops,” he said.

In 2016, an Inaugural Technical Teachers Symposium brought together various role players in the technical education including government departments, Technical High schools practitioners from seven provinces, industry partners, SETAs and artisan training academies.

“Today is the continuation of the partnership that was established in rallying together for skills and education development in South Africa.” he added.

The Conference was officially opened by the Deputy Minister of the Department of Basic Education Hon. Enver Surty   More than 300 delegates from across all nine provinces attended the three-day conference.

CAPTION

 

Engineering Jobs

Engineering Jobs

Every time I get an opportunity to communicate with young people, I make it a point to emphasize the importance of having good eye sight. Not necessarily that of the natural eye but that of the mind. Having a vision. I always go for this because I’ve come to…

Road Accident Fund eases pressure

Road Accident Fund eases pressure

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) visited the community of eMzinoni Township to offer a range of services to some residents who are car-crash victims. The accident fund’s visit was on Saturday, 24 June, at the Raymond Mavuso Community Hall.  This was part of the fund’s community outreach initiatives.

“According to RAF’s Media and Public Relations Senior Manager, Mr Linda Rulashe, at the heart of this community outreach is service delivery, and making a difference to claimants and everyone affected by the scourge of road crashes.

“Claimants are assisted with the direct registering of new claims, consolidation of required compliance documents, settlement offers, and reporting of cases involving alleged unscrupulous personal injury representatives and touts,” said Mr Rulashe.

The RAF is a juristic person established by an Act of Parliament, namely, the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (Act No. 56 of 1996) as amended (”RAF Act”). It commenced operations on 1 May 1997, assuming at the time, all the rights, obligations, assets and liabilities of the Multilateral Motor Vehicle Accidents Fund.

The RAF is responsible for providing appropriate cover to all road users within the borders of South Africa; rehabilitating and compensating persons injured as a result of motor vehicles in a timely and caring manner; and actively promoting the safe use of all South African roads. Section 3 of the RAF Act stipulates that “the object of the Fund shall be the payment of compensation in accordance with this Act for loss or damage wrongfully caused by the driving of a motor vehicle”. The client base of the RAF, therefore, comprises not only the South African public, but all foreigners within the borders of the country. The RAF provides two types of cover, namely personal insurance cover to accident victims or their families, and indemnity cover to wrongdoers.

Mr Rulashe  also said the most important information which needs to be provided for new claims include case numbers, accident reports, hospital reports, vehicle registrations and details of other parties involved in the car crash.

Those who were unable to attend the event are encouraged to visit the RAF at any of the following 11 Hospital Service Centres within the Mpumalanga Province where they can be assisted in lodging claims.

They are Kwa-Mhlanga Hospital (Kwa-Mhlanga).; Mmametlhake Hospital (Mmamehlake) Witbank Hospital (Witbank),  Standerton Hospital (Standerton),  Evander Hospital (Evander),  Themba Hospital (White River/Kabokweni), Mapulaneng Hospital (Bushbuckridge),  Ermelo Hospital (Ermelo), Piet Retief Hospital (Piet Retief), and Rob Ferreira Hospital (Nelspruit) and Tonga Hospital (Tonga).

For more information regarding the claims procedure and services of the RAF, contact RAF Call Centre on 0860 23 55 23 from Monday to Friday, 07h45 to 16h00.

Follow RAF on social media: Twitter: @RAF_SA, Facebook:  Road Accident Fund, and Instagram: RAF_ROAD.

 Mr Vusi Walter Mokoena and Ms Nomthandazo Mbuyisa are receiving help from Constable Sifiso P. Ndlovu of the eMzinoni Polic during the Road Accident Fund’s community outreach initiative in eMzinoni Township.

Ms Botshelo Nageng from the Road Accident Fund helping a claimant.

Road Accident Fund staff Mr Bongane Dlamini, Ms Busisiwe Slaffa (RAF’s Claims Organisation Manager) and Mr Ntokozo Khoza

Sky Hill Workshop Complex

Sky Hill Workshop Complex

Development on the Sky Hill Workshop Complex commenced in October 2009. By 2010 Sky Hill had secured its first order, the fabrication of a major portion of the steam ducting for Medupi Power Station.

According to Hydra-Arc Group Chairman and CEO Mr Jose Marciel, such demonstrates the need for this type of workshop capacity, not only in South Africa, but globally.

The Sky Hill fabrication is a state of the art pressure vessel, piping, heat exchanger and structural steel facility. The primary fabrication facility consists of 4 workshops representing approximately 55 000 metre squared under roof.

Current expansion would result in a total of 75 000 metre squared, inclusive of a 10 000 metre squared pipe shop and a 5 000 metre squared laser and plasma cutting shop. Outdoor fabrication platforms range up to 50 000 metre squared.

The primary facilities are supported by a 10 000 metre squared primary store for equipment, tools and consumable, approximately eight hectares of lay down area and material stores, an electrical shop, diesel and petrol mechanical shops, a fully equipped machine shop, a carpentry shop, a management and support staff complex and canteen and ablution facilities

Sky Hill Workshop Complex, a member of Hydra-Arc Group of Companies poise to capture a significant portion of the global pressure vessel market.  The new machine shop will soon have several impressive additions to expand Sky Hill’s machining capabilities.

Some of the specifications are Double Column Horizontal Boring Mill which consist of a single head capacity in X – axis with 33 metre range, Y -axis for both columns with 5 -metre range, 1,2 metre range in Z axis, 0,8 metre in W axis, 2 turntables, with 40 and 60 ton capacity respectively, 5 axis capable, fully automated head changes, fully automated tool changes and75kW spindle motor.

Vertical Machining Centre consists of 9 metre turning diameter, 300 ton table load, 5 metre daylight between chuck and ram, ram stroke of 2,5 metre, live tooling with a 37-

kW motor and turntable equipped with 2 X 140kW motors.

Bridge Type Machine Centre consists of a table size 5 -metre X 3 metre, table load 30 tons, fully automated attachment changer with indexable angle ahead, fully automated tooling system, ram stroke of 1.8 metres and 37kW spindle motor.

The equipment utilised in the workshop represent the very latest in technologic advancement and includes a PWHT oven (possibly the largest in the world) of 70 -metre long by 10 metre wide with a temperature range up to 750 Degree Celsius.

A second PWHT oven, is 15 metre long by 6 wide, temperature range up to 950 Degree Celsius.

The newest addition ‘Bay 4’ features an overhead crane lifting capacity from 6 – millimetres to 150 millimetres, a 1 250 ton bend press which can accomodate plate widths of up to 6.5 metres, specialized welding booms and rollers, designed and manufactured by

Sky Hill for the fabrication of large pressure vessels.

“The capacity coupled with our access to the very best artisan skills in the country will enable us to effectively compete globally, to retain work which previously left the country and to attract work from overseas.

“This will make significant contribution to local economic growth and job creation,” said Mr Marciel.

He also added that Sky Hill’s facility is a green building design and the primary workshop for example only utilizes natural light for day time production.  More than half of the Hydra-Arc Group’s Sky Hill facility is dedicated to new fabrication work, which is at the heart of the company’s future strategy.

The Hydra-Arc Group is a proudly South African business that has proved that, by developing local

skills and paying attention to quality and on-time delivery it is possible to be successfully and competitive in the challenging industry.

By taking on the global market the company intent to lead South Africa into a better future one with better job prospects for South Africans and a stronger local economy.

Hydra-Arc was initially established in 1987 to source and supply welding and maintenance skills for Sasol Shutdowns.  It has now established Sky Hill Heavy Engineering, Jomele Labour Hire and Placements, which recruits artisans for placement within the Group and on client sites for the duration of the project or maintenance contracts.

Jose Marciel Welding Academy was established in 2002, however the academy has evolved into the Mshiniwami Training Academy, with the capacity to train 1 000 artisans every ýear.

Mshiniwami offers practical skills development in boilermaking, pipefitting, welding and grinding, with the more competent trainees having the opportunity to complete their trade tests and become fully fledged qualified artisans.

Contact Hydra Arc on 017 632 7021 and www.hydra-arc.com

CAPTION

Sky Hill Workshop Complex, a member of Hydra-Arc Group of Companies poise to capture a significant portion of the global pressure vessel market.

See Better, Do Better

See Better, Do Better

by Gugu Ndlovu

Every time I get an opportunity to communicate with young people, I make it a point to emphasize the importance of having good eye sight. Not necessarily that of the natural eye but that of the mind. Having a vision.

I always go for this because I’ve come to understand that lack thereof is what leads one into a reckless lifestyle.

No one willingly surrenders their life to excessive drinking, promiscuity or drug abuse unless they are blinded towards their something; their future. ‘YOLO’ (you only live once) is a principle the young have adopted without question. I’m still to find someone who uses this phrase to achieve good, it always seems to come up when we’re justifying our deeds of blindness. I agree that we humans are no match to the legendary cats with their nine lives, but why not use the one life you do have to achieve something instead of destroying what you already have?

I take interest in the goals and aspirations of young people I encounter because they grant me the opportunity to impact their today using their tomorrow. Once I can get you to see yourself as that attorney, that nurse, that CEO; I then challenge you to weigh your habits and decisions in light of this ‘vision’. Many then realize that their habits and attitudes will delay, if not stop them in achieving their goals. Because it will definitely be harder to complete high school with a baby in your lap, a few more years and rands to bag that degree if every weekend is given to clubbing.

The trick with some is getting them to believe that they worth what they’re tempted to envision. Some come from backgrounds that make it near impossible to even imagine making it in life. Poverty has such a strong hold on them that out of frustration they are lead into habits that dig them deeper into the pits of lack. Others have been victims of sexual abuse from a young age and do not know a life other than being an object for sexual pleasure. The matter intensifies when they realize they can make a living through what once victimized them, why not when I’ve been through what I’ve been through?

Others have just made so many mistakes that their vision has blurred. They once dreamed, but their dreams have slowly diminished over the years.

Sure, such things have the potential to ruin life for you, but not if you don’t give them the chance to. You have a tenacity in you that can outlast every single obstacle that comes your way, you just don’t know it yet. I’m certain Joseph didn’t know it either when he was cuddled in the cushion if his father’s love. He probably thought it would be an easy climb up the ladder of success at that point, little did he know about the strength of his brothers’ jealousy.

He was snatched from his father’s lap to slavery. I can imagine that Joseph didn’t have to do any hard labor at home being the beloved last born and all, so he was probably less likely to survive slavery compared to his other brothers. But the problem here was who slavery was messing with, a spoilt seventeen year old, yes, but a spoilt boy who had one heck of a vision. And that’s what saw him through the pits, the slavery, and prison and landed him a royal seat in the palace.

He didn’t ask or volunteer for any of the things that happened to him, but he also didn’t use them as an excuse to not aim for better. In fact his father’s love and mother’s support couldn’t protect him when life happened. There was literally no one to draw strength from, he had to draw strength from the One who gave him the eyes to see what he had seen. He’s now one of the most popular Bible characters simply because he had a dream and wouldn’t let anything, even himself (read about his encounter with Potiphar’s wife in Genesis 39) stop him from realizing it.

So we are without excuse. God is both able and willing to give us what we see, only if we see it. So dare to dream, it is only those with sight that will escape the calamity that has befallen our generation .